nampande

After my husband died in 1989, his relatives attempted to evict me from our family house and land. I decided to rent land for cultivation. I had to travel four miles from home to that land every day with a child on my back. But I thank God that I reported the case and the judge was true and fair. Both properties were returned to me, and it’s where I am now.

I have tried my best to look for money to put up a strong house because the one my late husband left behind is not strong and might fall at any time. However, I thank God because I went 10 years without sleeping on a mattress and a bed, and now I have them and sleep well.

If it wasn’t for the love people showed me after the death of my husband, I don’t think I’d be alive now. My children are unable to support me, but it’s the support of others that have made me survive. Before, I had lost hope, but now it has been restored due to the love of others.

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